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Scudamore contrite about emails

first_img Scudamore has vowed to hold a series of meetings across football’s administration to reassure them of his commitment to promote women in the game. A meeting of all the Premier League clubs was called at short notice on Sunday night to bring the case to a conclusion after pressure on Scudamore intensified during last week. The case caused a storm of criticism of Scudamore and it is to be discussed by the Football Association’s inclusion advisory board on Tuesday. Initially, the Premier League’s audit and remuneration committee had been lined up to discuss the case, but on Sunday night a decision was taken to call a specially-convened meeting of all member clubs for Monday afternoon. McCormick’s statement said: “In these circumstances, and in the light of a previously unblemished record over 15 years of service to the Premier League, the clubs resolved unanimously that no further disciplinary action is required or justified.” He said the investigation had examined numerous emails and other documents, including those copied by Abraham, and that there was “no evidence of wider discriminatory attitudes or inappropriate language or a general attitude of disrespect to women”. Women who work at the Premier League were also consulted, said McCormick, which established “that there is no climate of disrespect of women in the workplace”. He added: “This view is particularly strongly held by female staff with direct experience of working with or close to the chief executive who have made it very clear that his conduct and behaviour have been beyond reproach.” Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore has spoken of his “sincere contrition” after the top-flight clubs decided against any further disciplinary action against him for sending sexist emails. The meeting in London decided against any action after hearing that the emails “did include some inappropriate remarks” but that he had apologised. Afterwards, Scudamore said: “Entering into email exchanges of this nature was wrong and the apology I have made is sincere, as is the contrition I feel. These exchanges do not reflect my views towards women in football, the workplace or in general. It is something that will never be repeated. “I appreciate that I have a tremendous amount of hard work to do to convince those in the game who do not know me that my leadership and work in the areas of equality and discrimination to date reflect who I am and what I believe. “So, I will now undertake meetings and discussions with a wide range of stakeholders in the game to hear their views and to reassure them that I will continue to do my utmost personally, and through all the Premier League’s means to help promote diversity and inclusion, develop the women’s game and support women who want be involved in football at any level.” Premier League acting chairman Peter McCormick said he had conducted an investigation into the matter in conjunction with specially-appointed external legal advisors and that the clubs accepted Scudamore’s “genuine and sincere apology”. McCormick said a female senior executive at the Premier League referred to in the emails had been copied in the exchanges and has confirmed that she “was not then and is not now offended by the references”. The emails – which referred to women in a derogatory terms, contained sexual innuendoes, and made jokes about “female irrationality” – were leaked by Scudamore’s former temporary personal assistant, Rani Abraham, to the Sunday Mirror. McCormick said she “was not exposed to them in the course of her duties but had to search for them in a private email account which she was not authorised to access”. Press Associationlast_img read more

By adding a full-time therapist, Syracuse Athletics wants to put mental health at the forefront

first_imgFor some athletes, the response to injury can prompt mental health issues such as anxiety, depression and sleep disturbance, according to the NCAA.That’s why, after Syracuse athletes undergo surgery, Assistant Athletics Director for Sports Medicine Brad Pike now offers them an idea for dealing with what may follow.“Hey, the counselor is available. It’s completely cool to do it,” Pike tells athletes. “… We kind of strongly push them to see our therapist,” Pike said later.Roughly one in five adults in the United States suffer from mental illness, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Two experts and numerous studies suggest that athletes may be at greater risk. NBA star Kevin Love and NFL star Brandon Marshall are among athletes to have gone public with their battles with mental illness.Last September, Syracuse Athletics made two therapists available exclusively for athletes. Both worked 20 hours per week. On March 19, SU Athletics positioned a single full-time therapist for athletes.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Our mental health services were a direct result of input that we got from student athletes at ACC meetings and at the NCAA convention in 2017,” Syracuse Director of Athletics John Wildhack said. “I came back and said, ‘We’ve got to provide more support services, more help in that area.’”A 2016 NCAA survey of nearly 21,000 Division I, II and III college athletes indicated that about 30 percent of students self-reported feeling “intractably overwhelmed” a month prior to the survey. A 2016 Drexel University study surveyed 465 athletes at Division I programs and found that nearly 24 percent of the athletes reported a “clinically relevant” level of depressive symptoms, and 6 percent reported moderate to severe symptoms.In March 2016, the NCAA published a guideline with best practices regarding mental illness, which includes encouraging schools to provide a therapist. Before that, the NCAA didn’t have a set of practices laid out.“Because college athletes are expected to play at such a high level of competition, especially in Division I, they have enormous pressure to perform and maintain their place on a team,” said Ellen deLara, an associate professor emerita in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. “This can help to create an atmosphere for them that promotes a lot of stress, which in and of itself can lead to anxiety and depression.”Athletes can also use medication, mindfulness training and yoga to promote a healthier atmosphere, deLara said.deLara said an important first step to better understanding the mental health issues associated with athletes lies in uprooting the stigma that poor mental health is tied to weakness. She said the stigma may trace back to ancient Greek sculptures, as they represent the “perfect specimen of a person.” In a similar way, athletes are considered to be a model, she said.In a growing “achievement-based culture,” there may be an increase in the percentage of athletes experiencing mental health issues over the next five to 10 years, said Robin Scholefield, a psychologist at the University of Southern California and associate director of the school’s clinical and sport psychological services for athletics. She consults with Division I and Olympic athletes. Oftentimes, she suggests mindfulness: The process of bringing one’s attention to the present moment through exercises focused on the breath.Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorScholefield said the key distinction between how athletes respond to mental health issues versus nonathletes is that athletes usually register fatigue and lack of motivation before sadness. This contrasts with nonathletes, who may experience sadness first.She said signs of stress specifically among college athletes include complaints of stomach or headaches, as well as dizziness.Mood swings, increased irritability and emotional outbursts also are signs because they may be an indication of an underlying stress issue, Scholefield said. The pressures of attending every practice, as well as quickly recovering from injury, contribute to athletes’ mental health issues.Cory Wallack, the director of Syracuse’s Counseling Services, said the primary benefit of a therapist in Manley resides in accessibility. He noted that last school year the trek from Manley Field House to the Counseling Center on Walnut Place is “about as far across SU property one can go.” Should demand increase, SU Athletics may expands its therapy services, he said.“Their ability to blend and be just another student is not possible,” Wallack said. “Where else do you have a student who can also be criticized as readily by the student population in an acceptable manner? Think about the missed free throw, the missed touchdown catch, the fill-in-the-blank. There’s just a heap ton of pressure there.”Wallack said members of all SU teams utilize the service.“Around the country, I think we’re on the front end of what’s about to be an explosion,” Wallack said. “You’re going to see a whole heap of specialists who are working with college student-athletes. The NCAA is treating mental health as a public health crisis at the level it needs to be treated.”Wallack said it’s integral that anyone, including athletes, not wait until they have mental health issues before seeing a therapist. That aligns with the NCAA report released two years ago: The guidelines emphasize mental health screening tools and written mental health referral plans — all before athletes even appear in their first collegiate athletic event.“We’re trying to get the point that mental health is just as important as physical health,” Pike said. “Or probably more important than physical health.” Comments Published on April 30, 2018 at 10:31 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Three groups get funding under Gaeltacht action plans

first_imgDonegal TD Joe McHugh has announced almost €6,000 funding for a Men’s Shed, a heritage project and a community band in the Gaeltacht.The grants are being sanctioned under the Gaeltacht action plan as part of the 20 year strategy for the Irish Language 2010-2030.Mr McHugh, Government Chief Whip and Minister for the Irish language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, said: “I am delighted to be able to announce funding for these groups which are promoting valuable community spirit, the language in the Gaeltacht and important cultural and heritage ties. “The money will help develop Buíon Ceoil Sóisearach Chroiceach Mór, An Clochán Liath which encourages young people to learn traditional music while speaking the language and there is also funding for a Men’s Shed group in Gleann Cholm Cille where local men are learning new trades and Paróiste Mhíobbhaí ar Aghaidh, Carraig Airt which will put on film nights bringing local heritage stories to life.”The grants from the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht include €3,845 for Buíon Ceoil Sóisearach Chroiceach Mór to enable them to purchase musical band uniforms, €1,208 for Scáthlán na bhFear, Gleann Cholm Cille, to purchase manufacturing tools and €879 for Paróiste Mhíobbhaí ar Aghaidh, Carraig Airt to purchase equipment for the Heritage Community Centre.Mr McHugh added: “These relatively small investments are hugely important for building community spirit and at the same time for preserving the strength of the Irish language.“I want to wish all those involved in the band in An Clochan Liath, the Men’s Shed and the heritage project in Carrigart continued success in their endeavours.” Three groups get funding under Gaeltacht action plans was last modified: May 7th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more